History of the Fitzroy Method

The Fitzroy Method has a unique history: it was not originally designed for the market. It was created with only one intention – reading confidence and mastery in the classrooms of the innovative Fitzroy Community School.

Hands-on Testing

They were created by Faye Berryman, co-founder, principal and Head of English at the Fitzroy Community School and Philip O'Carroll, co-founder of FCS, administrator, Head of Maths, former tutor in logic and linguistics at ANU and lecturer in the same subjects at University of Western Australia.

Philip and Faye watched and taught students over sixteen years, learning through much trial and experimentation.

Growing Reputation

It is now thirty years since the first Fitzroy Reader was written. Over that time, mostly through word of mouth, they have gained an ever growing reputation for sound learning principles, logical structure and inspirational results.

Indeed, in whatever education context they have been used - in the classroom, at home, in remedial reading, in accelerated reading – the Fitzroy Readers and support materials have consistently boosted achievement and confidence.

Eight Fully Revised Editions

Such is the success of the Fitzroy Readers’ that they have now run into their eighth edition. They have developed into a complete literacy program that includes fully integrated work books, computer software, audio materials and educational games.

The program has found its way into over three thousand Australian schools and inspired students in countries as diverse as Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia. It has helped students win many awards in creative writing, poetry and the like.

Broader Outcomes

Even more important than the immediate gains in academic prowess, however, is that most students of the Readers gain a greater love of reading and writing. This ultimately extends well beyond their formative years.

The dramatic conclusion that we draw from this is that a sound literacy method in the early years of childhood has far-reaching implications: children who read and write with confidence tend to have greater success in all fields of education.